On future thinking

How do we think in the future? I honestly do not know. This post is a speculative guess.

Moore’s law states that per every 18 months, the capacity in our technology will double. The cost of electronic chips will be on the constant decline, as it will become more intertwined with our lives. It will be as inexpensive as paper, and the internet will be ubiquitous. Our future, digitalized.

Now, how does that affect future thinking?

Imagine, a highly digitalized world with the internet imprinted into our lens, feeding us information so we don’t have to. Imagine a world where the first thing we do when we wake up is plug ourselves to the internet. Imagine a world where less what questions are answered and more how questions. This is all possible due to the devalue of chips and technology. According to More’s laws, our cell phones today has more capacity than all the computing power in the world during WW2. A sheet of computing chips tomorrow will be cheaper than paper.

We’d have little chips installed in our brains. We’d have little screens implanted onto our eyes. We would be encouraged to cheat, to utilize the web and derive information from the web. We would spark a new age of induction and exploration. Critical thinking would be encouraged and factual knowledge would be overrated.

As our ease to obtain information becomes infinite, our method of thinking will change. Right now, our educational system believes in tests and memorization. The more the adaption of information adapts into a part of us, the less we would have to focus on rote memory and standardized tests, and more on critical thinking.

With technology closer and closer to us. I predict that our world will undergo an educational revolution. But that’s just a hopeful, optimistic guess.

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2 thoughts on “On future thinking

  1. Sam Balogun

    when you put things that way, i wish i was born into that future so that i could start learning that way at a very young age. By the time technology is like that, our kids will be the ones truly benefitting.

    Reply
  2. oleg

    I don’t like the idea of undermining knowledge. Anyone can be intelligent, it’s genetic luck, but knowledge is truly power. Without knowledge intelligence is nothing.

    Reply

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